8

In terms of the vocabulary, not much is based on Esperanto. From the Slovio website: Esperanto? While Esperanto is a simple language its main problem is the fact that it is made up of too many unrelated languages and thus, if you speak Esperanto, no-one will understand you only other Esperantists. On the other hand Slovio, since it is made up of only ...


7

A long time ago, I was involved in a project named Folkspraak to create a Germanic conlang. It was entertaining, but it did not went very far at that attempt. Some grammatical hallmarks of Germanic languages are: A very simple tense system, present and past only, all other tenses are periphrastic and later acquisitions A past participle as third principal ...


7

Depends on how you look at it; the Interslavic page does say (as you have noticed) that: All three projects collaborated closely with each other from that time, and in 2011 Medžuslovjanski („Interslavic”) was chosen as a common name. Fruits of this cooperation were, among other things, a common dictionary, a common news portal and a common wiki. -- ...


6

A few years ago (about 2) these two projects united into the single one called Interslavic (2-nd version). So, since then it's a common project with unified grammar. Before it they were slightly different.


5

Yes, they show. Slovio is not a zonal conlang, it is supposed to be a kind of Slavic Esperanto. It took place 20 years ago, but nowadays noone wants to use it. Nevertheless, Interslavic is comprehensible for all Slavic people. Speaker of Interslavic went abroad to different Slavic countries and expressed their idea using Interslavic instead of native ...


4

There should be no problem in doing so -- just mix and match features from the various source languages. A precedent for this for example is English: the syntax/grammar is mainly Germanic, including many function words the vocabulary is mixed (Latin, Norse, Anglo-Saxon, Norman French, Indian, ...) I would choose on language as the "base" (in the English ...


2

This was not easy to find! A bit of jazz Semitic auxlanging going on here. Ayvarith seems to be an invented language based on Hebrew, Arabic and Aramaic.


2

Possible? Definitely yes! But I want to give you some more hints on how to do it: Base on common features: When choosing the sounds for your conlang, prefer those sounds that have a broad coverage in your language base, and avoid those the are specific to only one of them. Do the same for syllable structure, look what consonants can cluster with each other ...


1

Slovio isn't intended to be an IAL right? The fact that Esperanto is derived from many languages, is why it is suitable as an IAL. Otherwise It's just another Interslavic. That's what Esperanto was originally intended to be, but Zamenhof realized that it could be beneficial to the rest of the world, so he reworked to it into a suitable IAL.


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