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25

Polyglot is a piece of software made specifically for the organisation, and management of conlangs as a whole. I haven't used it personally (preferring pen and paper to a large extent), but I've heard a fair few positive things about it. Conworkshop includes a bunch of different tools for storing and organising things, but I've personally not found it ...


10

Should we expect Leipzig Glossing Rules to work for all invented languages? No, not all of them, but the set of languages for which they will not work is exceedingly restricted. Basically, just ask yourself "can my language be written in a primarily linear format?" If so, the Leipzig Glossing Rules are for you. If it is carried by sound, you can gloss it. ...


8

Since It's really hard to conceive of a human language whose grammar and syntax are truly outside the bound of what exists in natural language (despite Lojban fanboy statements to the contrary) to the point that the Leipzig rules can't be used for it. The Leipzig rules already are already designed to handle human languages, and human languages can get ...


8

One way, while working on paper is to divide things into multiple sheets, making sure to have plenty of extra space at the bottom of dictionary sheets, or alternatively grouping things via e.g. semantic field to not run into the alphabetisation issue to quite the same extent (though this can have the issue that the semantic field of some items might not be ...


7

To add to Gufferdk's answer, Mark Rosenfelder in The Language Construction Kit (online version) mentions the use of index cards (as professional dictionary makers used to do in the past) as well as a technique with two-columned pages: You can keep a dictionary in alphabetical order by maintaining two columns and just writing in one. New words get placed ...


7

There are some syntax "toys" online, eg http://www.zompist.com/gtg.html. This will help you write a (formal) grammar of your language, but you will need a good understanding of Generative Linguistics to use that. Otherwise, what else do you need instead of pen and paper? Maybe a spreadsheet to enter vocabulary? There are so many choices to be made on so ...


7

Well, LaTeX is a great platform for writing anything, and you already seem to use it to some success. So I suggest using LaTeX and creating pdf out of it for distribution. What helps in the long run is creating a font with all the special characters for your conlang. TeX and LaTeX come with a reasonably usable font creation program called METAFONT, but the ...


7

My inclination would be to simply create a font for my language's writing system, and then use that font in whatever application I'm using to build my dictionary or text corpus. You can then use e.g., Word's autocorrect or an additional program like AutoHotKey to change easy-to-remember/easy-to-type sequences to the specific character from your font - for ...


6

I would recommend using a transliteration into ASCII or something similar which can be more universally used if the correct font is not available. For example, Esperanto uses some uncommon diacritics (ĉ, ĝ, ĥ, ĵ, ŝ, and ŭ), which are not always available. As a result people write them by using the letter 'x' which is not used in Esperanto: cx, gx, ux, etc. ...


6

Apparently folks can do this with Memrise, as evidenced by the Sajem Tan lessons. There's been talk that I found on Duolingo forums, but if they're at all serious, they probably won't allow "dabbling". You'd need a serious effort to make and maintain enough lessons for people to actually learn a language.


5

There is the Vulgar fantasy language generator, which allows a small language to be generated for free, but requires a subscription for more substantial languages or advanced controls.


5

You may want to look into getting Fontlab or Fontographer. You can design your fonts in Inkscape or Adobe Illustrator and import them into the font software. From there, create ligatures that can do this. The good thing about ligatures is that in a search, you can search for the individual letters. For instance, if you use "æ" for "ae" then you search for "...


4

With pen and paper: Use index cards You need two sets of index cards, one ordered alphabetically in the conlang, the other ordered alphabetically in your native language. You can use index cards of different colour to retrieve, e.g., roots or basic words. The index cards take up some space, but 10k of them are still managable.


4

One of the easiest ways is a simple document in your favorite word processor: hawarççomtar, [hawarçç- +omtar] n.C. dancer hawarrôs, [*wel-] n.N. the will, desire; attachment hawartomar, [wartam < *wert-] n.N. spiritual awakening, spiritual awareness hawatam, [*wed-] D vb. sing hawatar, [*wed-] n.N. poison, medicine; saga hawatôs, [hawatam] n.N. song ...


3

We all had little experience to go on when we first started making languages! I'd actually recommend that you NOT make use of a conlang recipe resource. What you end up doing is little more than making an invented language like how the recipe writer makes an invented language. This just defeats the purpose of the art of glossopoesy. Instead, I'd suggest ...


3

The Fundamento de Esperanto was published in 1905, so as far as I know it's in the public domain everywhere. It's one of the foundational documents of Esperanto, containing a short grammar description, a dictionary of thousands of words, and crucially a book of exercises (called the ekzercaro). The ekzercaro fits what you're asking for. It is divided into ...


2

I will attempt to answer this question, despite not having read the book, so please take my advice with caution. Looking at the website of the book, zompist.com/syntax.html, you can see an outline of the contents. Rosenfelder describes the book as "a tour of modern syntax". Being a linguist myself, it looks like the book I'd loved to have had while at ...


2

I do not know of any tools that are specifically designed for producing syntactically valid text, but my own word generator Logopoeist could be made to work for that purpose, and it wouldn't be terribly difficult to update it to produce a program actually intended for that purpose. The reason for this is that Logopoeist already treats morphophonology as an ...


2

It is difficult for a machine to passively understand a language (it takes tons of time with machine learning, and that's for Google). Actively, that's even more difficult, as many machine responses are pre-programmed and rarely actually generated (and in that case, mostly nonsensical, but the question isn't for sensical utterances). It will be extremely ...


2

Elon.io lets you make your own lessons and courses. It spaces your repetition of each word/phrase based on how often you have been getting it right. It provides computer pronunciation options based on real world languages, as well as statistics on your set of words and performance.


1

You have a few options: They actually speak Portuguese, which although being similar to Spanish, is sufficiently different and incompatible to make them mutually unintelligible. The alien dimension was actually a rural area in Paraguay, possibly even an indigenous area, and its inhabitants speak Spanish as a second language and not fluently, with an accent,...


1

One place to start is the Universal Language Dictionary. ULD Version 2.7 is listed on the Frath Wiki. ULD Version 3 is available in Google Sheet form. The Universal Language Dictionary is a list of concepts that can be represented as a word in a conlang. Each concept belongs to a category such as "Function words", "Clothing", and "Foodstuffs". Each concept ...


1

If you're wed to the idea of using Vulgar to make English nonsense words, the best idea would likely be to manually set the dropoff rate using "equiprobable" and custom weights, as it's unlikely that any of the default options precisely match English text. If you can find out what the rate of occurrence of different English phonemes is, putting them in ...


1

Note that by synthesising vocabulary using a tool like Vulgar Lang, you will not even approximate English even when using the same distributional laws for phonemes. You will get a lot of words that could be English, but are just unused, you get known words but with other meanings, and you don't get morphology or syntax at all. Of course, "naturalistic ...


1

I use multiple sources for Lortho. For the most part, my notes are all kept on Google Docs and its lexicon is stored in Google Spreadsheets. For the display portion of the language I use three different websites: Linguifex, FrathWiki, and ConWorkShop. In addition, I created a challenge on Twitter and Instagram called Lextreme2018 which keeps track of all my ...


1

Like bb94, I use XeLaTeX, but I want to specifically mention the glossaries package (\usepackage[xindy]{glossaries}), which lets you use Xindy to automatically sort your words. Use XeLaTeX+Xindy because it supports Unicode. This lets you include glosses (\usepackage{gb4e}) and charts of irregular declensions right in your dictionary. It's a little technical, ...


1

Personally, I use (Xe)LaTeX, as well as a Perl6 script to convert a custom-made dictionary format into LaTeX markup. Don't really need anything else, other than the occasional pen and paper for jotting down ideas. You could also do everything on paper as Isoraķatheð does.


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