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In this article, it is mentioned: Primitive Quendian (language of the Elves in Cuiviénen) Avarin Various Avarin languages (some later merged with Nandorin) Common Eldarin (the early language of all the Eldar) Quenya (the language of the Ñoldor and the Vanyar) Quendya (also Vanyarin Quenya) (daily tongue of the Vanyar: closest to archaic Quenya) Ñoldorin ...


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To begin with, Tolkien writes in letter 142 that I love music but have no aptitude for it [...] Slavonic languages are for me almost in the same category. I have had a go at many tongues in my time, but I am in no ordinary sense a 'linguist'; and the time I once spent on trying to learn Serbian and Russian have left me with no practical results, only a ...


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peccuvo peccuvo (Quenya): Squirrel, lit. "nut-hider" [pec 'nut' + kuvo 'hider'] (source: Parma Eldalamberon #22 2015).


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OK, here are some details on classical Quenya and classical Sindarin (based on Helmut W. Pesch, Das große Elbisch-Buch, Bastei-Lübbe 2009) The phoneme inventory of Primitive Quendian was p t k pʰ tʰ kʰ b d g m n ŋ r,l ɣ w j a, e, i, o, u, ai, oi, ui, au, eu, iu An early addition to this repertoire were prenasalised consonants ...


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I don't know the exact changes Tolkien enacted, but here are a few in no particular order. You can tell they are quite inspired by real world sound changes in Celtic languages, which I'll mark in brackets. A good summary for quenya can be found here. Aspirates /pʰ tʰ kʰ/ become fricatives /ɸ θ x/ Lots of syncope, especially the second vowel in trisyllabic ...


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It is not possible to speak Tolkien's Elvish Languages. This may confuse some people, considering how much nonsense there is online for "how to speak Tolkien's Elvish" (there's even a wikihow article about it). But according to the Elvish Linguistic Fellowship, an organization dedicated to the study of Tolkien's invented languages, even Quenya and Sindarin ...


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It's a tough question, and one that may be impossible to answer. There are tons of references all over the internet, such as Wikipedia (whose sources look decent on this one), Wikia, and a half dozen others I looked at. Basically, though, it looks as though the consensus is that the Elvish tongue is divided into Eldarin (the tongue of the elves during the ...


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There is actually a neat analysis in Quenya according to a Tolkien Dictionary Site: am-: is a prefix that means "up" londë: means "(landlocked) haven" So you can imagine it describing a place that once was a harbour, but through geographical changes has become landlocked, and is possibly on a hill or mountain. Or it could be a refuge, a ...


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In the Comparative Tables, Tolkien wrote "East Lemberin is of Lithuanian type". Not really Russian, but that's as close as we can get for direct evidence. The Tables do show changes, to my knowledge, historically common/similar to both Lithuanian and Russian, and unique to other Elvish dialects. For example, kj > š, gj > j, kw > k, gw > ...


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Pater Noster in Quenya Poems in Quenya Some more poems in Quenya Pater Noster in Sindarin (JRRT for comparison) Pater Noster in Sindarin Poems & Stories in Sindarin Poem in Sindarin NB: I am not competent to guarantee that any of these works are "correct" or "grammatical", with the exception of JRRT's submission.


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Tolkien took inspirations from lots of existing languages. His inventions bear much resemblance to those languages in phonology and in syntax, but less obviously so in vocabulary. Ken's answer already presents the two best known languages (Finnish and Welsh) that gave rise to Quenya and Sindarin, but they were not all. Actually it[Quenya] might be said to ...


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As mentioned on Wikipedia, it was modelled on Welsh and some other Norse languages: Sindarin was designed with a Welsh-like phonology. It has most of the same sounds and a similar sound structure, or phonotactics. The phonologies of Old English, Old Norse and Icelandic are also fairly close to Sindarin and, along with Welsh, certainly did have an ...


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Quenya has tanwë which means "device, craft, construction." A search for "machine" on this site which may or may not be reputable gives a couple of other words in Quenya, Sindarin, and Noldorin. Tolkien did once use the word gun in the Hobbit. This question on sff explains that, and the top answer to it includes this quote: The Common Speech, as the ...


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