15

In general, we don't want to make descriptions so long and complicated as to be difficult to follow. That is more important than exact word count, in my experience (as an admin of the "toki pona taso" group on Facebook). For example, if someone mentioned a "poki kala suli pi telo ala", I wouldn't find that at all strange as a description of an empty aquarium....


10

mi wile ala e ni: mi wile e ijo nasa. I want not <obj>-this I want <obj>-thing crazy The same principle as in "I do not want to drink water." mi wile ala e ni: mi moku e telo. I want not <obj>-this I drink <obj>-water


8

One popular proposal that comes up in a lot of discussions on this topic is to base it on the direction of the official writing system (i.e. Latin characters). Thus "poki open" for left, and "poki pini" for right. However, there is still no real consensus on how to say "right" and "left", so these expressions might not be understood by everyone.


6

Li in these examples could be described as a copula - this is the name for a word whose function is to link a subject and predicate.


6

Basic English is minimal in that it limits the number of words in the language (though not as extremely as Toki Pona). It was intended to be an international auxiliary language (although it never really caught on). The language was used in 1945 in order to quickly teach Chinese sailors to understand naval orders. This was reported at the time in a Time ...


6

Building on the answer by thrig: one could say poka pilin (side with a heart) for the left side and poka pilin ala for the right side. It should be rather neutral and understandable as it is based on biology facts instead of culture-specific ideas.


6

Although one of the "o"s is usually dropped, you don't have to, especially if it adds a certain emphasis to something or has some poetic value in a song etc, or maybe if you're calling someone first, making sure they're listening, then continuing. It's just not often done. So for general purposes, yes, drop an "o".


6

The book by jan Pije and jan Lope says: We've learned how to address people and how to make commands; now let's put these two concepts together. Suppose you want to address someone and tell them to do something. Notice how one of the o's got dropped, as did the comma. jan San o, ... - John, ... ... o tawa tomo sina! - ... go to your house! jan San o tawa ...


5

It might be sona pi ijo tawa —knowledge of moving things— or sona pi ijo ante —knowledge of things that change.


5

toki! a, mi jo e sitelen tawa toki pona. nimi ona li linja pona. sina ken anpa e ona kepeken nimi tawa ni. 😉 Hi! Yes, I have a script for toki pona. Its name is linja pona. You can download it by using this link. 😉


5

Mapping word class jargon from one language to another is a dicy project. Lojbanists decided that they needed to invent entirely new words for word class jargon. That said... All the toki pona particles (o, li, e, pi, la) act most similar to Japanese particles or English clitics, eg. "the". Clitics bind to a phrase. There are other tests for what counts as ...


5

Calling li a particle or predicate marker is correct and not misleading. A Toki Pona clause can have more than one predicate. li never marks a non-predicate. It also appears on every predicate except when that predicate is the first one in the clause and the subject is exactly mi or exactly sina (101) or when preceded by the vocative/imperative particle o (...


5

toki! Toki Pona has a word for mercy, and it is simply olin, just like love, tenderness, warmth, etc. For instance: mi jo e olin tan sina (I have mercy because of you), or mi jo e olin tawa sina (I have mercy for you).


5

The particle la in Toki Pona is used mainly for two scenarios. The first scenario is for the If/when something, then that condition. The la particle is placed in the second half of a sentence. Some examples: mi lape lili, la mi pilin ike (If I sleep a little, then I feel bad or When I sleep a little, I feel bad) sina moku e telo mute, la sina anpa e telo ...


4

Some of the coffee circumlocutions are rather long like "telo wawa pimejo seli", but in practice you can find shorter ones sufficient in the context There is even a Reddit about the question: Toki Pona coffee.


4

Yes, but when this happens, you have to consider two possibilities: This is really a content word followed by many, many modifiers A particle has been omitted. For the toki pona parse I wrote, I have an arbitrary cut off of something like 5 modifiers. telo kala seli jelo waso wawa kulupu soweli jan li suli. The beasty, familial, powerful, bird-like, ...


4

Based off the audio file from this website, and the audio files from this website, we can infer that Toki Pona is a "fast" language. It uses 6 - 8 syllables / second, except with punctuation, where you delay for the same time as English. Some Youtube videos stick to the contrary, but their speed is slow to make it easier for nonexperienced Toki Pona ...


4

To capture all of physics, perhaps "sona pi pali ijo" or simply "sona pali" (a knowledge of action). I prefer the former, since persons may tend to think only of human action with the latter, which may translate to "behavioral science", whereas the former is a bit more precise. Physics is a general field that focuses on the behavior of things in our ...


4

sijelo is "body, physical state", so you could use sona sijelo; physicists would probably like sona ale or sona ali, "knowledge of everything" :)


4

Proving a negative is always difficult, but as far as I can tell there is no obvious candidate for what you're looking for and if you made one yourself it would presumably fill an empty niche in the Toki Pona universe. At least I haven't found any sites written in English yet that seem to fit the bill. The closest thing I can find to what you are looking ...


4

The consensus answer (thanks Oliver Mason) for how to translate Haters gonna hate into Toki Pona is the following: tenpo ale la jan ike li ike Tenpo ale la translates as at all times and captures the sense of inevitability in haters gonna hate in English. It also serves to rule out other possible readings such as the tautological bad people are bad. Here ...


4

You're right that a 'la' phrase can't be inserted in the middle of a sentence: it always precedes a sentence, providing additional context (or a conditional). This is the only way I've seen used in the community. And by way of concurrence, from pu page 23, "[la] allows you to link two sentences, or link a fragment to a sentence." There are a couple ...


3

It sounds like you're after a trie. The closest example I can think of is this glosbe site. It has a search tool, which orders matches in the way you want, but not in the structure you want. . The only issue is that there are fan created/added word combinations which may not be 'official'.


3

The syntactical li structure was inspired by Toki Pisin ... and in an online Tok Pisin grammar I found : [...] Tok Pisin has its own grammatical rules. First of all, look at the following sentences: Mi wok. 'I worked.' Yu wok. 'You worked.' Em i wok. 'He/she worked.' Tom i wok. 'Tom worked.' Note that the last two sentences have the little word i ...


3

(I'm not an active tp speaker, so this is not based on my experience of usage, but just from the official book) You could split it into two sentences (as suggested in lesson 17 of TLoG): mama o pali e ni: tenpo lili la sina moku "Dad, do this: eat quickly" This has the advantage of having the addressee at the front, and it keeps the overall ...


2

I think you can express something like this as (101). If we imagine a speaker addicted to using their smartphone, they might say something like this. Mi wile ike e ilo toki. (101) 1sg want bad D.O. tool speak I think to want badly in English would map to wile mute, since you're talking about extent rather than making a value judgment. Making a ...


2

The advantage of just leaving two o's is that you have one fewer rule to make people learn. Merging o's might sound better especially if o o is something that sounds wrong in your mother tongue. Sandhi, the rules for pronouncing and changing pronunciations of words at barriers is undefined in toki pona- no one with any clout ever definitively said anything ...


2

Here are a few ways to deal with the problem of marking the vowels unambiguously: Style 1 - normal Hebrew orthography Considering the fact that there are no length distinctions or gemination, a transliteration into Hebrew would normally use exclusively these diacritics to represent the vowels: a אָ * e אֵ ** i אִי o אוֹ u אוּ * add ה at the end of a ...


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