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20 votes
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Is there any concept of "isomorphic" constructed languages?

There is the term relexification meaning that the words of a given language are replaced by new words without changing the structure of the starting language. Relexification does not only occur in ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
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14 votes
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Does the grammatical and polysynthetic structure of my language preclude poetry?

The verbal suffixes making most sentence ends sound the similar doesn't necessarily mean you can't do rhyming poetry - in fact, you can go out of your way to make them rhyme exactly the same. The ...
Arcaeca's user avatar
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6 votes

Syntactic word that carries no meaning - is there a name for that?

I am not aware of a generic term covering all instances of function words without meaning, but only some specific cases. The pronoun it in phrases like It's raining or It seems that ... is called a ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
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6 votes

Syntactic word that carries no meaning - is there a name for that?

One general term would be function words; these are words that do not carry any lexical meaning, but are used to link content words together and clarify their relationships (eg in the case of ...
Oliver Mason's user avatar
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6 votes
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How can I talk about weather without expletives?

Here are some ideas haven't been listed yet Allow nouns denoting weather phenomena to form clauses by themselves Use an existential construction Make the subject a location Use an all-purpose weather ...
Greg Nisbet's user avatar
  • 1,715
5 votes

How can I talk about weather without expletives?

There are also language with impersonal verb conjugation, and of course, nothing prevents a verb from being used only in the impersonal. Nahuatl has an impersonal voice, but because it's only used ...
Circeus's user avatar
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5 votes
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How would a language of whistles work

Real-world "whistled languages" are generally adaptations of spoken languages, taking some aspect of the phonology (tone, prosody, sometimes formants) and conveying it through whistling. A ...
Draconis's user avatar
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5 votes
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How to structure sentences to be able to distinguish between verbs, nouns, and adjectives etc.?

There are plenty of languages that require explicit marking on certain categories of word. In Latin, for example, all nouns need to be marked with case and number, and all verbs need to be marked with ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
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Is it reasonable for numerals to behave like verbs?

One clear-cut example of a language that treats many things like predicates, numerals included, is Khoekhoe. Khoekhoe marks many kinds of predicates the same way, including numerals. The paper argues ...
Greg Nisbet's user avatar
  • 1,715
4 votes

Words for numbers in a language with bijective numeration

The solution I've gone with is to use two different words as jk suggests in his answer. In speech, both "one-dozen and twelve" ("rurinye-tendi") and "two dozen" ("...
OpenAI was the last straw's user avatar
4 votes
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Words for numbers in a language with bijective numeration

Just have two different words, like "twelve" (T) and "dozen". Than the number 1T is one-dozen-and-twelve.
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
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4 votes
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Is placing the preposition before the verb natural?

You're conflating a couple different things here. First are phrasal verbs in English, where attaching a preposition to a verb gives it a different meaning: "call" vs "call off", ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
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What is the relationship between order of object and verb and the position of adverbs?

First, the site behind the link you provided argues against any correlation of object-verb order and adj-noun order. The order of adjective and noun is often claimed to correlate with the order of ...
Dodezv's user avatar
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4 votes
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Specificities of VSO languages and common ones with SVO languages

As far as universals are concerned, VSO languages are generally "head-initial", just like SVO ones. In fact, it's common for languages to be categorized into "VO" versus "OV&...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 4,616
3 votes

What are necessary elements to morphologies that rely upon syntax in 2D?

All natural spoken languages are linear. Phonemes come one by one in a sequence over time1. As a result, all writing systems for natural spoken languages are also linear2. Glyphs come one by one in a ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 4,616
3 votes

What are necessary elements to morphologies that rely upon syntax in 2D?

One aspect would be an indication of reading direction. E.g. Egyptian hieroglyphs can be written in multiple directions, but you can see from the orientation of (non-symmetric) glyphs which is the ...
Oliver Mason's user avatar
  • 4,133
3 votes

Words for numbers in a language with bijective numeration

if the base system is deeply ingrained in the language (in most (all?) natlangs it isn't, numbers predate modern positional notation by millennia; let's say your language had the notation for a long ...
Radovan Garabík's user avatar
3 votes
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Dealing with core argument loss from syntactic applicativization

I don't think there are any attested languages that limit the role that relative clause heads can have in the matrix clause. The accessibility hierarchy is a theory explaining the capabilities of ...
Greg Nisbet's user avatar
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3 votes
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Implications of secundative alignment

So, here are some of the implications of choosing secundative alignment. They aren't really strict implications so much as Stuff You Might Consider Thinking About™. I think the effects of choosing ...
Greg Nisbet's user avatar
  • 1,715
3 votes

What are the places where I can attach an indication of tense in relation to a conjugated verb action?

The most prominent positions in a sentence are the beginning and end, and so those positions are frequently used to indicate the information structure of a sentence. A word carrying grammatical ...
curiousdannii's user avatar
  • 3,740
3 votes
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What are the places where I can attach an indication of tense in relation to a conjugated verb action?

Since it’s your conlang, you can put it wherever you think is best—but my inclination would be immediately adjacent to the verb it applies to. Your sentence structure seems to be VSO, so ...
Jeff Zeitlin's user avatar
  • 1,142
3 votes

Syntactic word that carries no meaning - is there a name for that?

A common term for such a word would be auxiliary. An example from the Australian language Walmajarri is ma-rna-n-ta-lu, where ma is the auxiliary to which the suffixes are attached. However as your ...
curiousdannii's user avatar
  • 3,740
3 votes

How to structure sentences to be able to distinguish between verbs, nouns, and adjectives etc.?

Apart from adding syllables, you could use word order in combination with with prosody (tone, emphasis, pausing...) and other pronunciation differences. Some brainstorming examples for you to remix: ...
Vir's user avatar
  • 1,296
3 votes

For a strict SVO language, how do you handle complex sentences?

The short answer is that "SVO" is shorthand for "the subject comes before the verb and the object comes after". It doesn't mean that every sentence consists of exactly three ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes
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How to structure verb phrases (as opposed to noun phrases)?

Verbs like "wake up" and "turn on" are known as phrasal verbs in English, and they have some very interesting syntactic properties. For example, "turn on" (phrasal, ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 4,616
2 votes

What tools exist for creating syntactically correct generated text in new languages?

I do not know of any tools that are specifically designed for producing syntactically valid text, but my own word generator Logopoeist could be made to work for that purpose, and it wouldn't be ...
Logan R. Kearsley's user avatar
2 votes

What tools exist for creating syntactically correct generated text in new languages?

It is difficult for a machine to passively understand a language (it takes tons of time with machine learning, and that's for Google). Actively, that's even more difficult, as many machine responses ...
Duncan's user avatar
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2 votes

Syntactic word that carries no meaning - is there a name for that?

I have heard the term "Proverb" used to describe the word "do" as it is sometimes used in English, and that seems to be something you're trying to achieve here. Example: Q. "...
Nic Estrada's user avatar
2 votes

Syntactic word that carries no meaning - is there a name for that?

This word is acting as a copula. It is entirely reasonable for the copula to be omitted in some contexts and not others. For example, Hungarian requires zero copula for third-person constructions in ...
OpenAI was the last straw's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Strategies for marking boundaries between potentially discontinuous top-level clauses

What are some ideas for features that could be used to support disentangling discontinuous top-level clauses? Interesting question! For a start, some languages have ‘verbal classifiers’ (Aikhenvald ...
bradrn's user avatar
  • 652

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