7

Define categories for aspirated and unaspirated voiced stops, voiceless stops, and fricatives: A=ḅḍġǵ U=bdgɠ V=ptkƙ F=φþxẍ (I’m forced to use strange characters for each of these phones due to the one-character-per-phone restriction of SCA².) Then Grimm’s law can be reversed as follows: U/A/_ V/U/_ F/V/_ (As far as I can tell, PIE had none of /ɸ θ x xʷ/. ...


4

It depends on the word in question. Not that many English speakers would recognise laser as an acronym, so it has effectively become a 'normal' word. And it can be inflected, as in She was lasering away that old tattoo. It is different for acronyms that are spelled all in upper case, I think; NATO is kind of 'frozen' in that respect, and I doubt it will ever ...


3

If you want to be strict, coerce them into your phonological rules. Macy's: that would fit as macys; if /y/ is not a vowel, then macis Outback: start with a consonant, so use one that is not too pronounced, such as /h/: hotback [*]. Also drop the /u/ from the diphthong. Or use hatback if your /a/ is pronounced more open (in that case hatbeck might work ...


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