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The history of sign languages is more akin to that of creoles than that of a constructed language which later gained native speakers. Consider the following two examples: The grammar of Esperanto and a large chunk of its vocabulary was created, codified and written down by L. L. Zamenhof. People who were interested learned his language according to his ...


11

The constructed versus natural language distinction is less of a binary opposition, and more of a continuum. There are many spoken languages as well that can partially qualify as 'constructed', including Standard Italian and Nynorsk. Every language to some degree has been modified by someone's conscious choice. A conlang is set apart largely by the degree of ...


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There are very few constructed sign languages. On the subreddit, we sometimes get questions about whether anyone has made any, which usually don’t get many replies. This one here has some examples given, and also links a website which has basically the answer to your actual question: SLIPA is an attempt by David Peterson to fill the lack of sign language ...


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The best I've found, for linguistic purposes, is HamNoSys ("Hamburg Notation System", Hanke (2004)). It works like IPA: it is more an instruction-notation than observation-notation. For example; IPA allows glottal stop [ʔ] together with (i.e.) palatal, dental, alveolar and labial fricatives, but these are indistinguishable. Another example: [m͡n] (depending ...


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