14

Am reading through LotR now, and have just finished H, Lost Tales, R, FG, etc. so the memories are still pretty fresh. The Ring verse is the longest bit of Black Speech, followed by Grishnákh's bit of invective towards Ugluk. Other than that, there's only a couple individual words (like snaga, slave and ghash, fire) to be found. Tolkien himself wrote as ...


12

Here is another researcher (Prof. Ian Maddieson) suggesting exactly such correlations: In a presentation on Wednesday at the Acoustical Society of America fall meeting, Maddieson showed that consonant-thick languages like Georgian are more likely to develop in open, temperate environments. Meanwhile, consonant-light languages like Hawaiian are more likely ...


12

There has also been evidence that suggests that ejectives tend to occur more frequently in areas of higher elevation, perhaps due to their being easier to produce in these regions: We present evidence that the geographic context in which a language is spoken may directly impact its phonological form. We examined the geographic coordinates and elevations ...


7

There have definitely been serious linguistic theories about environment affecting features like this - the ones I can remember off the top of my head are that certain sound changes in Proto-Germanic were because its speakers had thicker phlegm or something and that tonogenesis is more likely to occur in certain tropical climates. The latter was a relatively ...


7

There are some syntax "toys" online, eg http://www.zompist.com/gtg.html. This will help you write a (formal) grammar of your language, but you will need a good understanding of Generative Linguistics to use that. Otherwise, what else do you need instead of pen and paper? Maybe a spreadsheet to enter vocabulary? There are so many choices to be made on so ...


5

There is the Vulgar fantasy language generator, which allows a small language to be generated for free, but requires a subscription for more substantial languages or advanced controls.


4

To my big surprise the relevant issue of Sionsharfe is now digitised and freely available from Digitale Bibliothek München. The first sketch of Volapük at this moment still named only Weltsprache or Allsprache, the word Volapük itself can be found a few month later, occurs in Nr. 35, Vol. IV (1879) Beilage as a supplement. What a fascinating document! ...


4

If you're looking for parallels in animal communication, there's plenty of good evidence that environment shapes the kinds of sounds used. For instance, Henry & Lucas (2010) showed that birds in forest habitats (more absorption) were more sensitive to frequency changes (FM), as modulated narrowband sounds (essentially, vowels) are more reliably ...


4

You can find many articles at SiDoSi (sidosi.org)'s resources page or at this tutorial on blogspot. Also, I'd recommend a translation of "The second major book about Solresol, written by the other major contributor to Solresol, Boleslas Gajewski," also at sidosi.org over here. Note that SiDoSi (sidosi.org)'s resources page has an error that ...


4

This website contains a video and links to some resources. The most important is this PDF, which explains gestures ("Dritok Gestural Syntax"), phonology and grammar.


3

According to the Font of All Knowledge, Simlish worked best as a "language" made up of gibberish words that could not be translated, so that the dialogue's meanings would be left open to the imagination of the player. and that William Wright, the Sims creator, intended it to be that way. Here's a good Youtubeumentary on the topic. The voice actors, ...


3

Unfortunately not. There are a few concepts (like colour terms or kinship terms) that are regularly studied in linguistic typology and where one can find a lot of publications including high-level overviews including a lot of unrelated languages. For the most concepts, there is nothing comparable available. Maybe one can find studies (e.g., from ...


3

Sorry I missed this question. Many of the main links on Sidosi's Resources page are unreliable, but you can view the archived copies by expanding the info box for a resource (click the + to the left of the title), or clicking the "Show/Hide All" link near the top of the page. Alternatively, there is a beta Resources page that hasn't been widely publicized ...


3

The Fundamento de Esperanto was published in 1905, so as far as I know it's in the public domain everywhere. It's one of the foundational documents of Esperanto, containing a short grammar description, a dictionary of thousands of words, and crucially a book of exercises (called the ekzercaro). The ekzercaro fits what you're asking for. It is divided into ...


3

We all had little experience to go on when we first started making languages! I'd actually recommend that you NOT make use of a conlang recipe resource. What you end up doing is little more than making an invented language like how the recipe writer makes an invented language. This just defeats the purpose of the art of glossopoesy. Instead, I'd suggest ...


2

I will attempt to answer this question, despite not having read the book, so please take my advice with caution. Looking at the website of the book, zompist.com/syntax.html, you can see an outline of the contents. Rosenfelder describes the book as "a tour of modern syntax". Being a linguist myself, it looks like the book I'd loved to have had while at ...


1

One place to start is the Universal Language Dictionary. ULD Version 2.7 is listed on the Frath Wiki. ULD Version 3 is available in Google Sheet form. The Universal Language Dictionary is a list of concepts that can be represented as a word in a conlang. Each concept belongs to a category such as "Function words", "Clothing", and "Foodstuffs". Each concept ...


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