8 votes
Accepted

How to classify the language of "Uncleftish Beholding"?

I wouldn’t personally call Anglish (that is, English without non-Germanic (or sometimes even non-Anglosaxon) vocabulary) a conlang. Taken at face value, it replaces English vocabulary 1:1 with coined ...
user avatar
  • 3,252
5 votes

How to classify the language of "Uncleftish Beholding"?

I'm going to disagree with Adarain and say that Anglish might be a conlang in instances where it is used to as full an extent as in Uncleftish Beholding, though I think it pretty much straddles the ...
user avatar
  • 3,241
3 votes

Is there a specific term for a substitution cipher language?

"code" or "coded language". Probably mostly used in conjunction with sign languages, where the signs replace the (spoken) words (e.g. Signing Exact English as opposed to "natural" signed languages), ...
user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Is Glosa more than just a relex of English?

While Glosa definitely does seem to take a lot of influence from English, it's grammar isn't quite so indistinguishable from English's as to be an obvious relex. It avoids classic relex mistakes ...
user avatar
  • 3,241
3 votes

How to classify the language of "Uncleftish Beholding"?

This has been called "Anglish", a type of constrained writing. As compounding is a productive force in English (ie, it happens frequently and is not limited to an existing set of words), I wouldn't ...
user avatar
  • 3,511
2 votes

Is the language of The Gostak more than just relexified English?

Well, it is pretty clear that this is just relexified English, just look at the function words: at, the, of, where, but, is, with, .... Also the syntax is 1:1 English syntax, and even the inflections ...
user avatar
2 votes

Is there a specific term for a substitution cipher language?

I think we could use some terms from physics here. Let's say a relex is isochor (alternative: isomek from Ancient Greek mêkos "length") if it preserves length of words, and isotonic (alternative: ...
user avatar
  • 956
1 vote

Is there a specific term for a substitution cipher language?

I have never heard of a "substitution cypher language." One might adduce Pig Latin or Double Dutch as examples of such a thing, but these are not conlangs. They are typically called "language ...
user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible