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4 votes
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Is merging singular and dual naturalistic?

It's certainly not common. One of Greenberg's linguistic "universals" (number 34) says that, in languages with a number distinction, the first distinction made is always singular versus ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

Mathematical Quenya Symbol?

I don't believe so, no. The idea of writing equations with symbols like that is actually a very recent invention, historically speaking; ways of representing numbers go back to the very beginnings of ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes

Inventing A Plural Form For First And Second Person

Have you considered agglutinative pronouns? At least initially, in the precursor language, henceforth "Old Simplicius". Start with three pronouns that are strictly 1st, 2nd, or 3rd person ...
No Name's user avatar
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3 votes

Is there a good natural reason for a language to declare infinite cardinalities as "plural" and finite cardinalities as "paucal"?

I think this question is posed from the wrong perspective. It is of course perfectly possible to describe a system of grammatical number that distinguishes between finite and infinite cardinalities, ...
Tristan's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Is there a good natural reason for a language to declare infinite cardinalities as "plural" and finite cardinalities as "paucal"?

I wouldn't expect that in a natlang, no. When a language has a mandatory marking that goes on every noun (or verb or etc), it's always something that's frequently important or useful to distinguish. ...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes
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Famous or memorable ways make sequences of numbers express something?

The big difficulty with an encoding like this is that the functional load is distributed very unevenly across the syllables. If you miss the sixth digit/syllable, that's not going to affect much. But ...
Draconis's user avatar
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