9 votes
Accepted

Features of unlearnable languages

If you search for the researchers mentioned in the article, you can find some of their research papers. In those, they describe their methodology. In one paper that I looked at briefly, for example, ...
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8 votes

Features of unlearnable languages

Original Fith is a stack-based conlang (LIFO, reverse polish notation) and considered to be unspeakable in real-time since in order to speak good Fith you need to be able to remember more parts and ...
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  • 221
7 votes

Features of unlearnable languages

I've seen a paper that children have a lot of trouble learning nonconservative determiners. For instance, "every" is a conservative determiner because every dog is brown is equivalent to every dog is ...
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  • 351
4 votes

Could you have a language with only three words?

After seeing a lot of different things thrown out there, I've decided to take a shot at this one. I think what you are suggesting is totally possible and plausible. The confusion of answers arises ...
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3 votes

Could you have a language with only three words?

From an information theory point of view, you can express anything if you have at least two signs: computers do this through the use of binary, where the signal is either "on" or "off&...
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3 votes

Is there a language that meets these criteria?

I think it should be toki pona. Reasons: semantically close words must share a common affix (not like biology and mathematics in English which are sciences but do not have the same suffix) In toki ...
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3 votes

Could you have a language with only three words?

If you really mean "morphemes" or "phonemes", then yes, of course you could design your language this way. One straightforward example is the Morse code, composed of three symbols - dot, dash, pause. ...
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1 vote

Is there a language that meets these criteria?

The best one that I've seen is probably Esperanto. It has a relatively small vocabulary that makes up a great bulk of the words and there are different affixes that change the meanings of words. For ...
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1 vote

Could you have a language with only three words?

Your terminology is a little strange, but it sounds like your suggesting something like the tri-consonantal roots of Arabic. For example, د ر س represent the idea of acquiring or giving knowledge. ...
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1 vote

Could you have a language with only three words?

I haven't (and won't) check your math, but you have defined a grand total of 96... I'll call them blocks. I'll take the position that a block represents a sufficiently new type of language element ...
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1 vote

Could you have a language with only three words?

If this is a language, then it should be possible to express more than just three words. You would need to be able to say, for instance, "the dog bites the cat." Imagine that we derive dog from sazar, ...
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