20

Click consonants are rare in natlangs, but rather popular in conlangs, though despite this, given the existence of things like !Xóõ reality is stranger than most fiction in this specific regard. Language-game/conlang(?) turned actual spoken register Damin had several phonemes not seen in (other?) natural languages, such as an ingressive glotally interrupted ...


18

Yes. I am not familiar with any “well-known” conlangs, but a quick search reveals that Klingon verbs inflect for both subject and object. This is a phenomenon called polypersonal agreement and it is very common in natural languages, and so it is only expected that it would also crop up in several conlangs. Among them, for example also my own, for which I ...


16

There's also the brilliant masterpiece kay(f)bop(t), which features the dextral lateral click (a click made on the right side of the mouth) the sinistral lateral click (a click made on the left side of the mouth) the manual stop (a clap, which may only occur in morphemes pertaining to penguins) the faciomanual click (a facepalm, which may only occur in ...


14

In Ithkuil, a geminate /h/ can be produced as a bidental fricative, a sound which is only attested in a single dialect of a single natural language. hh The geminated version of Ithkuil h is pronounced in either of two ways: (1) as a “bi-dental” fricative, in that the jaw is completely closed and the upper and lower teeth are in near-contact ...


11

TAKE is Το Ἄνευ Κλίσι Ἑλληνική / Greek Without Inflexions. According to Ray Brown, "Graeca sine flexione" ... (considers) what Greek might be like if stripped of its inflexions in the manner similar to Giuseppe Peano's Latino sine Flexione... It should be pointed out that although Giuseppe Peano produced 'Latino sine flexione' as an international auxiliary ...


11

CALS lists 9 conlangs where the verb only agrees with P in transitives, 20 where it can agree with either A or P, and a further 127 where the verb agrees with both A and P, though of the ones listed, the only really well-known one is Klingon, which Adarian also mentioned. Including Mark Rosenfelder's langs (which aren't in CALS) in the at least relatively ...


9

Eressilian (Hittite) I wrote the answer you linked, which talks about Eressilian, a conlang based on the Hittite language, supplemented with loanwords from Arabic, ancient Greek and Persian. I talked there about the Greek influence (which is slight, from the information we have); the Hittite roots are of course much stronger. An example passage given by the ...


7

The obvious comparison to make here is to Japanese, as it's a real-life hybrid script and is currently the only non-Chinese language to use them. However, it's important to consider that Japanese did not have an existing writing system when Chinese characters were brought over, and for quite a while the Japanese elites wrote strictly in Classical/Literary ...


7

Lojban differentiates between inalienable possession, alienable possession, and association: po'e, po, pe. But Lojban does so because its design aspired to typological completeness: it's followed the textbooks in its differentiation between alienable and inalienable possession. See http://www.lojban.org/static/publications/refgram_chunked/cllc/8/3/ "...


6

It strikes me that, while this is not precisely what you're asking, Law French I think it might be argued fits the bill. While French, of course, was the everyday language of the upper class in England from the mid-11th to the late 14th century, and was therefore naturally the language of the Law, it can hardly be called a "constructed language". But after ...


6

Looking at the list of fallacies you quote, I would say this is not possible — most of them have got nothing to do with the language itself, but with the way it is used. It's a bit like making a kitchen knife that you cannot use to hurt someone with. The Fallacy of Composition is related to reasoning. I cannot think of any way that a language can make ...


5

This is pretty common in natural languages. Think about English words -- most of them have an inherent part of speech and require derivational affixes to change that. "Anger" is inherently a noun and requires "-y" to become an adjective, whereas "excite" is inherently a verb and requires "-ment" to become a noun or "-ed" or "-ing" to become an adjective. ...


5

More of a pidgin experiment than full fledged con-creole, but worth a mention anyway: Viossa. Being made by conlangers, it likely has somewhat more elaborate grammar than most pidgins though (such as a morphological passive marker and a lot more adpositions than you’d find in most. Source: am co-creator).


5

Additionally, Lang Belta, which is the constructed creole spoken on the science fiction television show The Expanse.


5

To name a few: Da Mätz se Basa: High German. Old Piscean: British English. Kjā: Yoruba. Cheyoon: Mandarin. Al Mastizu: a creole of English, Spanish and Arabic.


5

Certainly there are a few! Modern Tocharian: Tocharian Talarian: more Indo-Hittite Ememir: Sumerian Probably more lurking about the shadows...


5

Here are the top five best-known (see footnote 1). Lojban at lojban.org is the better-known successor of Loglan. Loglan at loglan.org is based on formal logic and is to some extent not unlike a transcription of formal logic (see footnote 2). Ithkuil at ithkuil.net is like the two above but is as compact as possible, allowing to read, write, say, and hear ...


5

Short answer: I've never seen or read a description of what you're seeking. Long answer: What you're seeking is a most unlikely beast, reason being... Generally speaking, auxiliary languages seek being completely or nearly completely a posteriori for reasons of simple expedience. Common design goals of an auxiliary language are ease of learning and ...


4

After a bit of searching, the only remotely Greek-based altlang I've found is Eressilian, which is mentioned only in the above Reddit post. It claims to be the result of the evolution of the Hittite language, after mixing with other languages in the region surrounding Asia Minor. These languages (notably Persian, Arabic, and Greek) mainly contributed ...


4

I recall some years ago, someone submitted a greeting for Conlangery that was a bunch of insect sounds. According to the conlanger it is meaningful, though I don’t vet greetings too thoroughly. Also, in my earliest conlang, Yeltax, there is a harmonic tone, with two simultaneous pitches. It’s impossible for humans to produce in normal speech, as the aliens ...


4

I am not aware of an attempt on legal language (legal terms tend to differ very much depending on national traditions and culture), but in the technical domain there is Eugen Wüster's Terminologieschlüssel as a basis for standardised technical terminology.


4

Solresol actually reverses the syllable order of a word to denote an opposite meaning, though this occurrence is inconsistent through the creator's published dictionary. For example, fala means good, but lafa means bad, and falaredo means accessible, but dorelafa means inaccessible.


4

One suggestion I'd give: use Proto-Indo-European lexicon for the words you want in your own proto-language, then use a word generator to create the actual roots of your language. That way you're not going to run into the problem of a having a word list that accidentally includes terms your proto-speakers would be unlikely to have.


4

Yes. The Whispering Language is designed for communicating with deaf-mutes -- a language that can easily be lipread. Ahtialan came to be used as a whisper language. Xylphika only rarely demonstrates voicing. Parseltongue seems to be compounded of sibilants and voiceless vowels.


3

I tried to find conlangs based on such sounds but could not find any. However, the closest human phonemes to such sounds are clicks and many conlangs use them. I don't know any well-known conlangs that use clicks, but HyPry and Gdili were two that I could find. You could try making one yourself, but given that Beatbox sounds are fairly limited and sometimes ...


3

The only legitimate examples from the Wikipedia article International auxiliary language are Nerrière's Globish (2004) and Interslavic (2006). Both of these fail OP's criteria, since they are specific to one language branch. Other instances either predate 2000 (Kotava, Lingua Franca Nova), or were not intended as auxlangs (Lojban) or both (Toki Pona). To ...


3

I think you are looking for the constructed language called Lojban According to an earlier reference to its grammar, Technical note for readers conversant with relativity theory: The Lojban time tenses reflect time as seen by the speaker, who is assumed to be a ``point-like observer'' in the relativistic sense: they do not say anything about physical ...


3

Ted Chang wrote "Story of Your Life" which was the basis for the movie Arrival. I thought both the book and the visual representation in the film were excellent examples of languages based on a travelers use of time. In this story understanding the language is to understand your life as a simultaneous event, and thus have access to all moments at once. You ...


3

There are various "a priori" constructed languages, though they are not as successful as "a posteriori" languages have been. They include: Spokil Ro Kotava Solresol Babm Blisssymbols (Written, ideographic language only) Nal Bino (modification of Volapuk) Sona


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