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19

The language still has Okrand's guidance, and he trusts Robyn to do it correctly. From IndieWire: Before Stewart initially took the “Discovery” job, she did check in with Okrand himself to make sure he approved. “He said, ‘You know what? I’m really glad you’re doing this for two reasons: One is so I don’t have to do it.’ Because just for a movie, it’s a lot ...


15

The official Klingon orthography according to the Klingon Language Institute is the Latin transcription. It is what Marc Okrand, the language's creator, developed and uses. The Klingon script used in from Star Trek: the Next Generation on, known as the Okuda script (Michael Okuda was the set designer for Next Generation), is used, but it's worth noting that ...


11

This answer is based largely on my copy of The Klingon Dictionary (written by Marc Okrand, who created Klingon), which is reliable and good if you need a quick translation from English to Klingon or vice-versa. I'm going to cover most of the same ground as rotaredom's answer, just in more detail. The book notes that there aren't really any greetings in ...


8

According to klignonwiki.net, there isn't an exact equivalent, but you do have a few options: nuqneH: It's the only word that could literally be called a greeting, but literally it means, "What do you want?" It's possible as a conversation starter, though. (Also indicated by kli.org.) qavan: Litterally, "Salute." It's actually the imperative, meaning that ...


8

Considering this question is a rehash of another question on SX, I'm inclined to say it's chance resemblance — and not a very high one at that. It is very highly plausible that it was designed by a non-linguist at Paramount (if I understand correctly) at a time when there was no easy way of finding out about Tibetan even with the budding Internet of 1992 ...


7

Apart from the word for "forehead" being diagnostically different in the various dialects of Klingon (as pointed out by @JeffZeitlin), the only other canonical information I know of is that in some dialects, <D> and <b> /ɖ, b/ are pronounced as /ɳ, m/ (<N> and <M>—though I don't remember if those transliterations are canonical, or ...


5

pIqaD shows up here and there, but in my experience (which is 20 years old, but I haven't seen much to contradict it), its use is emblematic. People will put a word up here and there, and it will appear in T-shirts; but people do not read connected texts in it. As is, pIqaD is indeed unwritable with a pen. I experimented in my time with ways of making it ...


5

There have been stroke ordering proposals by fans devising handwriting of pIqaD. One is http://klingonska.org/writing/examples/pic/zrajm-piqad.jpg , from Zrajm of Klingonska Akademien: http://klingonska.org/piqad/. Another had been proposed by the late Glen Proechel's group: Interstellar Language School (lead by Glen F. Proechel) has published “An Alien ...


3

I think it depends on the context. If it is "I can see bears and metal drums", then you would have to repeat the subject and verb, effectively saying "I can see bears and I can see metal drums". As per The Klingon Dictionary (6.2, Complex Sentences): When the subject of both the joined sentences is the same, the English translation may be reduced to a ...


3

According to Wikipedia, about 20 or 30 fluent speakers Another more interesting article, a bit more scholarly, mentions a wide variety of numbers per study.


3

Mark Shoulson revived the proposal to encode Klingon in Unicode, in a 2016 document called “pIqaD (Klingon) and its Usage.” In it, he gives several examples, including a comic book, Star Trek: [Manifest Destiny] #1, translated into Klingon and printed almost entirely in pIqaD. The most recent example I’ve seen of someone using pIqaD in a context that has ...


2

According to this answer on Science Fiction and Fantasy Stack Exchange, no. The author draws from the official Klingon language website, saying: "...the producers called on professional linguist Dr. Marc Okrand to create authentic speech for the Klingons. His task was to make their language as alien as their ridged prosthetic foreheads, while still ...


2

Indeed, there doesn't seem to be any canon word for "skull" in Klingon, so a compound should be fine. Note, however, that some compounds are constructed without separation between their parts (see for example Wiktionary's list of Klingon compound words) with no apparent rule as to why, so "skull" could conceivably be nachHom. BUT, since -Hom is also ...


1

I would translate it as I am looking for bears and I am looking for the sheep that are lost. — I don't know the word for sheep, so I assume from your question that it's DI'raq: mIl'oDmey vInejtaH 'ej DI'raqmey chIlpu'bogh vInejtaH bear-<pl> <I-them>-look for-<cont> and sheep-<pl> lose-<perf>-<...


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