10

From reading the answers to the Worldbuilding SE you reference, I would draw the following conclusions: anything unvoiced goes out of the window. So no /f/, /p/, /k/, /t/, /s/ etc. They are pretty useless, as they are predominantly in the higher frequency ranges (especially the fricatives) or very short and without much energy (which would be provided by ...


6

A while ago, someone on reddit tried to test this experimentally (using a bathtub). Here’s what they found: Vowels Overall, these were the hardest to distinguish (at least personally). The most striking vowels were /æ, i, u/. /a, o, ɑ, ɒ, ɔ/ all seemed to blend together, losing distinction. The same happened to close-mid and open-mid center ...


6

The first thing is: Design not only one word for each geographical feature, use several of them. To give some examples from a natural language (German in this case): A mountain may have a name in -berg (which is frequent in the mittelgebirge) but also -spitze, -horn, -kopf, or -kuppe. Some beacon mountains have names of their own without an element meaning "...


5

There are many factors that make actual real-world placename not look schematic (unless, maybe, you're looking at Japanese placenames...) Have many different etymological sources from names In practice, names have a lot of forms, and the younger the names, the more varied the forms: religious names (i.e. saints) and feasts, people names ("X's place", "X's ...


4

Unfortunately, the English Wikipedia does not have an article on Slavic toponymy yet, the best attempt I am able to find is Bulgarian placename etymology giving at least some hints. You can find interesting Slavic roots to play with in the article on Slavic given names. Additionally, there are some Slavic based conlangs out there, you can honour one of them ...


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