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6 votes

Convergent evolution in languages

Some words are very consistent across the world for non-linguistic reasons. For example, "mama" consists of the earliest sounds infants are able to make. This is the same reason languages on ...
Draconis's user avatar
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5 votes
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How to prevent all of my words being eroded away to nothing

As a general rule, regular sound changes wear away at words, reducing their information content. Countering this, morphosyntactic changes restore the lost information. For example, let's look at Latin....
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes

From what could I derive a morpheme that explicitly marks a noun as being a phrase head?

How about a topic marker, like Japanese wa? You could start with a deictic of some sort ("this thing right here"), which got semantically bleached into a general marker of new information (&...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes

How to prevent all of my words being eroded away to nothing

Sound shifts are to some amount irreversible. Long before your words are completely gone, the rate of homophones rises and the speakers of the language have to deal with it in some way or another. The ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
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3 votes

How to prevent your conlang from explosively growing

The most important thing to remember is: if you're going for naturalism, speakers need to be able to learn patterns and extrapolate them between words. If a sound change gets in the way of this ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes

Do we have any conlangs which are "primitive" languages?

I don't know of any attested languages that work this way, constructed or natural. Humans are very good at finding ways to communicate, and if you put children together with no exposure to outside ...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes

Extending venitives/andatives

It is not uncommon for natlangs to use directional morphemes on verbs quite systematically, with very thin relations with their full meaning. For instance, rGyalrong languages have sets of ...
Erithacus Rubecula's user avatar
2 votes

Do we have any conlangs which are "primitive" languages?

There is of course the Pleistocenese, somewhat plausible artlang meant for the Neanderthals. In many ways it breaks our preconceptions, it has no separate phonemes (word=morpheme=syllable‚Čąphoneme), ...
Radovan Garabík's user avatar

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