21 votes

Does Esperanto have any words that mean more than one thing?

One also has to bear in mind polysemy: a word that might correspond to one concept in English might translate to two different words in Spanish or German. A classic example is “corner”, which can be ...
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  • 3,282
19 votes

Does Esperanto have any words that mean more than one thing?

One such word is vato, which means both "watt" and "cotton wool. Wikipedia says that the physical unit "Watt" was first borrowed as ŭato, to distinguish it from vato ('cotton-wool'), and this is ...
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  • 1,414
18 votes

Are there concrete examples of slang developing within a conlang?

Wiktionary has a list of Esperanto internet slang but most of these I've never seen or heard used before (at least in the main esperanto chats on Telegram). Esperanto slang terms I've heard or used ...
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13 votes

Are there concrete examples of slang developing within a conlang?

In Esperanto, the word knuflo is mainly used by young people, who participate in local meetings, around the dutch-speaking regions of Flanders and the Netherlands. It is almost not used in ...
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  • 231
11 votes
Accepted

How Standard Average European is Esperanto?

Tl;dr: Esperanto possesses about 8/12 SAE features Let's go through these features one by one. This is going to be pretty long, sorry for that. For reference, I'm using the famous Haspelmath paper as ...
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  • 3,271
10 votes

Does Esperanto have any words that mean more than one thing?

In addition to the examples cited above, it's worth noting that due to Esperanto's extensive use of derivation and encouragement to use affixes as productively as possible, there is the potential for ...
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  • 3,271
10 votes

International Auxiliary Language created by a Japanese person

Assuming that the OP misremembered a few facts, the language may be Babm, invented by the Japanese philosopher Rikichi [Fuishiki] Okamoto (1885–1963) and first published in 1962. It uses the Latin ...
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  • 219
9 votes

How Standard Average European is Esperanto?

Esperanto shares a number of similarities with Standard Average European and is definitely Eurocentric. One Eurocentricism is definitely non-existent in Esperanto, and two are questionable. ✱ ...
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  • 1,705
9 votes

How much of Slovio is based on Esperanto?

In terms of the vocabulary, not much is based on Esperanto. From the Slovio website: Esperanto? While Esperanto is a simple language its main problem is the fact that it is made up of too many ...
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  • 199
8 votes
Accepted

What do double consonants specify in Esperanto?

There are two questions (with answers) on the Esperanto stackexchange dealing with this problem (and yes, it is perceived as a problem even among Esperanto speakers): Double letters in Esperanto ...
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8 votes
Accepted

International Auxiliary Language created by a Japanese person

I have found the language again, it is named Zilengo and it was designed by OKA Asajiro in 1890. Apparently not much information about the language is preserved.
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7 votes
Accepted

What are the aspects of Esperanto?

Whoever told you Esperanto lacks verbal aspect was lying to you. Yes, aspect isn't mentioned in the 16 Rules. However, this clearly doesn't mean Esperanto completely lacks aspect -- the 16 Rules are ...
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  • 3,271
6 votes

Languages where the part of speech of a root is "fixed"?

This is pretty common in natural languages. Think about English words -- most of them have an inherent part of speech and require derivational affixes to change that. "Anger" is inherently a noun and ...
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  • 3,271
4 votes

Are Esperanto's part of speech endings actually beneficial?

For those unfamiliar with Esperanto POS suffixes, -o noun -i verb (infinitive) -a adjective -e adverb For example: sano - health sani - to be healthy sana - healthy sane - healthily ...
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3 votes

Are Esperanto's part of speech endings actually beneficial?

POS markers are markers, same as syntactic position, both derived morphology and otherwise. In a noisy environment it may be helpful to mark things more than once, so if someone couldn't figure out ...
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2 votes

Does Esperanto have any words that mean more than one thing?

The selection of words in Esperanto tried to prevent: homonyms, same sounding words: trajn/o = train, railroad, trejn/ist/o = trainer; but also poliso = (insurance) policy, politiko = policy, measure ...
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2 votes

Why are compound words in Volapuk hard to parse while compound words in Esperanto are not?

Esperanto phonotactics was never as restrictive as Volapük's. Its prefixes (including prepositional prefixes) are mostly not CV but CCV or VC, and its stems often enough begin or end with consonant ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Slang in Esperanto

La sociolekta triopo Manuel Halvelik created three sociolects for Esperanto, Arcaicam Esperantom (1969), an archaic pre-form of Esperanto, Popido (1973), a constructed dialect of Esperanto, and ...
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1 vote

Does Esperanto have any words that mean more than one thing?

The term homonym is usually used for words that are spelt the same and pronounced the same, and i think this is what is intended here. Homographs are spelt the same but pronounced differently and ...
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1 vote

Does Esperanto have any words that mean more than one thing?

The words plaĝo & strando both mean beach. Another example is kruro & gambo for leg. See this question. Plaĝo is from French plage. My guess is strando comes from the Norwegian word stranden ...
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  • 449
1 vote

How much of Slovio is based on Esperanto?

Slovio isn't intended to be an IAL right? The fact that Esperanto is derived from many languages, is why it is suitable as an IAL. Otherwise It's just another Interslavic. That's what Esperanto was ...
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  • 449
1 vote

Languages where the part of speech of a root is "fixed"?

Esperanto roots principally can basically form nouns/adjectives/adverbs and adverbs (and are not words themselves): Endings: -o noun -a adjective -e adverb -i verb, infinitive Roots and derived ...
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