6

There is already a conlang that kind of does that. In toki pona you can write the words in a set of pictograms (actually, there are several pictogrammatic writing systems, I'm referring here to the 'hieroglyphs' from the official book). As there are only 120 words, it's easy to have pictograms for all of them. The only problem is what happens with other ...


5

One consideration is the source of the symbols themselves. DINGIR had the syllabic value /an/ in Sumerian, but it also stood in for the word "god" because An was a Sumerian god. (And, one step further, DINGIR still meant "god" in Akkadian even though the Akkadian word for god was now ilu.) The Sinaitic inscriptions were written in an abjad, and yet (may ...


5

You may be interested in E-Prime. E-Prime is a version of English that excludes all forms of the verb to be, including all conjugations, contractions and archaic forms. This makes many objective statements like "Roses are red" impossible. Instead a person is required to use more subjective constructions like "Roses appear red to me".


4

Basically, your question is misstated. In our own world, languages cannot enforce philosophies. You can be a Hegelian, a Tomist, a Berkelian, or a Marxist, in any given language, from Modern English to Ancient Farsi. After all, all languages have this pesky word, "no", so that anything that can be affirmed can also be negated. In a constructed world, ...


3

Humans in such kind of situation devolop a Pidgin specifically for trade. It is arguably easy not only for humans but also for robots: no complicated ingredients in syntax nor morphology, and also usually a simple phonology.


2

How about Polynesian languages? The people travelled far distances, their culture was very spread out, and they don't really have a country that 'owns' the language. A further positive aspect is that you can pick up basic Hawai'ian on Duolingo; this quickly gives you a feel for the language. It's VSO, so sounds unusual enough to Western cultures who are ...


2

We can have two classes of nouns: souls, and the perceptions and ideas of souls. Ideas nouns must be inflected for who they are being perceived by: you, God, or whoever. This would have the effect of turning a sentence like "The dog is red" into "The dog seems red to me." Secondly, instead of saying "The dog…" or "There is a dog…", you would say "I have the ...


1

I don't think you can generally assume a strong correlation between the vocabulary of a language and culture of the kind you are asking about. Just like the "50 Eskimo words for snow" is a myth, it would also apply to other languages... Not knowing the language in question I would think that there is a cultural influence, but not as obvious as having more ...


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