Hot answers tagged

8 votes
Accepted

How would the grammar of a conlang develop as a creole from other languages?

I would think that it relates to the power structures behind the language communities, and to their relative size. This can be kind of observed with English after the Norman invasion. The basic ...
Oliver Mason's user avatar
  • 4,018
6 votes

Are there any examples of artificial creoles of natural languages?

Additionally, Lang Belta, which is the constructed creole spoken on the science fiction television show The Expanse.
iro's user avatar
  • 61
5 votes

Are there any examples of artificial creoles of natural languages?

To name a few: Da Mätz se Basa: High German. Old Piscean: British English. Kjā: Yoruba. Cheyoon: Mandarin. Al Mastizu: a creole of English, Spanish and Arabic.
elemtilas's user avatar
  • 3,245
5 votes

Are there any examples of artificial creoles of natural languages?

More of a pidgin experiment than full fledged con-creole, but worth a mention anyway: Viossa. Being made by conlangers, it likely has somewhat more elaborate grammar than most pidgins though (such as ...
Sascha Baer's user avatar
  • 3,482
4 votes

Has AI technology yet provide a language composed of multiple human languages yet?

Not really AI, but the vocabulary of the two logical languages Loglan and Lojban was created algorithmically from the vocabulary of pre-defined source languages. In this case, the phonemes of the ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
3 votes

How would the grammar of a conlang develop as a creole from other languages?

Yes, the vocabulary of a creole would be mixed, though it's likely that one of the parent languages provides most of the words. I concur with the previous answer to also look at English, since it does ...
Ira Black's user avatar
3 votes

Do we have any conlangs which are "primitive" languages?

I don't know of any attested languages that work this way, constructed or natural. Humans are very good at finding ways to communicate, and if you put children together with no exposure to outside ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 4,016
2 votes

Do we have any conlangs which are "primitive" languages?

There is of course the Pleistocenese, somewhat plausible artlang meant for the Neanderthals. In many ways it breaks our preconceptions, it has no separate phonemes (word=morpheme=syllable≈phoneme), ...
Radovan Garabík's user avatar
2 votes

Has AI technology yet provide a language composed of multiple human languages yet?

This is something different from my first answer: Mixing syntax There is a project named Galactical Dependencies where the authors started with dependency treebanks of some known languages and than ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
2 votes

Has AI technology yet provide a language composed of multiple human languages yet?

The problem I can see with trying to do this is that you would first need to be able to encode the urlanguages in a way that a computer could understand. One could imagine giving it corpora from the ...
A. R.'s user avatar
  • 1,423
1 vote

Has AI technology yet provide a language composed of multiple human languages yet?

IF I ever get around to constructing a conlang I'll probably algorithmically generate its vocabulary from Wiktionary entries. Wiktionary includes pronunciations in IPA format (and audio files), ...
Robert Larkins's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

I'm creating a constructed language. Does this type of conlang exist?

Probably something similar already exists. Languages of this type are called somewhat despectively Euroclones in the conlang community and the field of such languages is pretty well trotted out, ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible