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10

I think the best conlang to look for such cases is Ithkuil. http://ithkuil.net/04_case.html contains a list of all cases. My [short] research suggests that some of them (e.g. navigative for "noun relative to whose vector, arc, or trajectory of motion an event takes place" or allapsive for "amount of time that expected to pass between the contextual present ...


9

This is merely a marginal answer and I’m sure there’s a lot more data that might prove valuable, but in multiple Romance languages (at least Spanish and Romansh) the preposition a has developed into an accusative marker for particularly animate objects. This preposition derives from Latin ad “to(wards)” and is in both languages somewhat equivalent to English ...


6

Ignoring the lost natlang, I'll just answer the title question: There are several possibilities to let nouns end in any phoneme of the language and still have case inflections: Most simple: Have a zero ending in the nominative singular Base your inflection on prefixes (like in Bantu languages) or infixes (like in Semitic languages) BTW, inflections with ...


5

Yours is a very interesting and legitimate question, but in the light of what we know from the languages of the world, what you ask might not be what you mean to ask. Let me expand a bit below. To answer your question in brief: no, your language does not need a Dative, but yes, your language needs a device (or "construction" in Construction Grammar ...


4

Interesting concept for a case. In my interpretation this kind of an abstract distributive case would apply in sentences like this one (a probably very clumsy reformulation of a famous first sentence in literature) Every unhappy family is different in their unhappiness. I looked up the really case-rich conlang Ithkuil and did not find a precedent for this ...


3

I suspect you could just make up a name. That's certainly a legitimate glossopoetical strategy. In English, i'd just call it a distributive sense of the state-noun and have done with it: Such-and-such only happens thrice per childhood, you know! Or ...thrice childhoodly if you prefer! I frankly don't get the difference between LOC/ABL/ALL & ESS/...


3

There are some languages with unusually irregular plurals or verbal forms, but I don't think any language has something quite as stark as what you're demanding here. Mostly because, as you point out yourself, a system that basically makes it impossible to recognize what case a noun is in unless it was previously learned by rote would be so taxing on the mind ...


2

Any declensional system that involves suffixes will limit "what nouns can end in", because nouns can only end in the declensional terminations of that language! Even if you maximise by disallowing repeats, you can come up with say eight stem formations and say eight cases across four numbers. If you make each of these 256 forms "unique" (such that -am never ...


2

Here are some possible solutions to this problem that haven't been listed already. mark case with tone or another suprasegmental feature case disfixes have a large class of indeclinable nouns achieve free word order via noun classes and agreement 1 Case Tone Maasai marks case with tone. It's predominantly VSO, but frequently uses VOS order if the object ...


2

If I understand you correctly (big if there!), you are looking for a periodical state that repeats, not necessarily at the same time interval (though the two might in reality be linked) — as it happens we are using the sun rising as a proxy for the time passing. This could be a tree blossoming, or losing its leaves. It could be the tide coming in. It ...


1

You might consider something like: "I gave you it" > "I gave it so that you recieved it" "I told you it" > "I said it so that you heard it" "I passed you it" > "I threw it so that you catch it"


1

Your lang, your rules. But generally speaking, no, you don't need a dative case. Funny thing is, you don't even need a dative case even if you were to wrack your brain and come up with handfuls of potential situations! Languages are funny that way. Those sneaky native speakers will just come up with some clever way of handling things!


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