14

The verb "to grok", having been coined by Robert Heinlein for his Novel Stranger in a Strange Land has gained significant popularity and is used with the same meaning as in the original language. I am however not sure whether this meets the criteria of coming from a constructed language: To my knowledge the martians' language is clearly stated to be a full ...


10

Should I destlangize the word, or leave it in its “native” form? In natural languages, borrowed words are almost always "destlang-ized" to some degree, but it won't necessarily always to the same degree. Even within the same language, often some borrowed words will be more integrated into the language than others. The more recently a word was borrowed, the ...


10

Danish has borrowed the word Volapük (spelt volapyk in Danish) from the conlang of the same name, however unlike in the source where it means "world language", in Danish is has come to have the meaning "nonsense, unintellegible garbage", as in Det er det rene volapyk! "It's all Greek to me (lit. it is the pure volapük)".


8

The most common one I can think of is yahoo, which was the name for brutish humans in the language of the Houyhnhnms from Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels. The words Lilliputian and Brobdignagian have also entered the language from the same source, as have big-endian and little-endian, supposedly calques from the fictional Lilliputian language. Utopia ...


5

At the risk of sounding too obvious, the word Esperanto has been borrowed into many natural languages, with the meaning of "universal neutral way of communication". See e.g. phrases like "mathematics is the Esperanto of natural sciences" etc.


4

There are a few words in Esperanto that are arguably borrowed from Ido; examples include olda "maljuna, malnova" and kurta "mallonga". With respect to the subquestions: These words didn't need any changes, they already blend perfectly into Esperanto. The borrowings from Ido still are in a niche position in Esperanto and live mainly in the poetic register. ...


4

The word Qapla' ("success") is listed as an English word on Wiktionary, which in essence means that it is regarded as an English loanword from Klingon. It has sparked some debate, but it has survived Wiktionary's verification process twice (once in 2007 and again in 2008), even after a specific policy limiting words from fictional universes was instituted. ...


3

One thing you may want to consider is how the sourcelang word reached the destlang. If the word was spread through literature to the destlang speakers, then it may be spelled the same as it is in the sourcelang but pronounced according to the pronunciation of the destlang. If the word is spread through oral communication then it may sound like the sourcelang ...


2

An addition to Sparksbet's excellent answer I'd add one tool to your armamentarium: DENATURALISATION of BORROWINGS Sometimes foreign words borrowed a long time ago from L1 become naturalised in L2 only to become denaturalised again in later times. In other words, the legitimately L2 word becomes more like the antecedent L1 word. Case in point, PEKING. ...


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