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Questions tagged [unnatural-features]

For questions about language features with no parallels in natural languages

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3 votes
2 answers
115 views

What made Tolkien's diachronics purposefully not naturalistic?

Somewhere else I heard that Tolkien's languages had some purposeful non naturalistic diachronics with stuff like elvish languages having the elves make some purposeful changes to them partially due to ...
Informer's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
201 views

To make a conlang indeciphrable

How to make a language/code indecipherable or very hard to decipher/learn? What are the key points? How does linguists decipher languages?
regenbogen9's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
535 views

An all consonant language? (Part Two)

I'd like to create a language with only consonants, using the letters b, ch, d, f, g(hard), j, k, l, m, n, p, r, s, sh, t, th (voiced and unvoiced), v, z, and (most importantly) h. I feel like the h ...
Mocascoolai's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
249 views

An all-consonant language? (Part One)

I'd like to make a language that only has consonants. Since I kind of feel like the letter "h" is a consonant, I'd prefer to omit it. The language would include b, ch, d, f, g(hard), j, k, l,...
Mocascoolai's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
434 views

Roadmap for effective construction of a novel language

I have trivially dabbled in Esperanto, Klingon, and a few other languages. Now I want to build one, and not a distorted copy of an existing one. I want to make a non-junk constructed language. Is ...
EngrStudent's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
187 views

Are there conlangs designed to be whispered?

We all know that natural languages can be whispered and we use whispering for several purposes, e.g., to avoid someone unwanted listening, or in order not to disturb a larger audience. But are there ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
  • 11.3k
10 votes
3 answers
281 views

A biphonic language

How could a language evolve such that the vowels are biphonic (like in throat singing)? Note: Biphonicity is when two notes/tones are sung simultaneously. There are languages that are whistled or ...
Aezyc's user avatar
  • 487
4 votes
1 answer
128 views

Alternatives to independent verbs for encoding desiderative meaning

English uses an independent verb to encode desiderative meaning, namely want. It normally takes an infinitival complement, although I can take a direct object as well if the subject of the infinitival ...
Greg Nisbet's user avatar
  • 1,715
9 votes
2 answers
389 views

Should I include morphology in my proto language?

Most, if not all natural languages have some form of morphology, such as noun case or poly-personal agreement. However, these features are usually evolved from prepositions and auxiliary verbs, and ...
Tateran's user avatar
  • 93
6 votes
6 answers
922 views

Could you have a language with only three words?

Don't immediately dismiss this! Just give me a moment to explain and you might realize it's an idea that might have merit, especially considering the question title is a little misleading. Also, I'm ...
Rory M. Tims's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
317 views

IPA for Voiced Velopharyngeal Stop?

A conlang I am working on contains the nasal syllabic consonants [m̩] and [n̩] fairly frequently. It seems like it would be a natural step for the language to develop what I would call a voiced ...
user avatar
12 votes
1 answer
390 views

Are there constructed languages with a tense system inspired by Theory of Relativity?

For readers who aren't familiar with the Theory of Relativity, here is a sketch of how the Special Theory of Relativity structures space and time: There is a point "here and now" where the observer ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
  • 11.3k
2 votes
1 answer
149 views

Is there some more detailed information about Dritok available?

Dritok is a conlang by Dan Boozer without any voiced sounds. It is said to be based on chipmunk sounds. While this language even has a wikipedia article, I was not able to discover some more detailed ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
  • 11.3k
5 votes
2 answers
242 views

Are there human beatbox inspired conlangs?

Human beatbox is an art form producing percussion sounds with the mouth only. It uses techniques and sounds that are rare or entirely absent in natural languages. Are the constructed languages that ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
  • 11.3k
7 votes
1 answer
273 views

Grammatical cases occurring only in conlangs

What are examples of grammatical cases that are not attested in natural languages, but occur in some conlang? To qualify here, the conlang should have at least some bit of flesh (e.g., a few ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
  • 11.3k
11 votes
3 answers
626 views

What reasons would there be for not having a human conlang with only vowels?

All natlangs have both consonants and vowels, but it's not immediately obvious why a human language couldn't be made from only vowels. Has anyone theorised about why natlangs always have consonants? ...
curiousdannii's user avatar
  • 3,730
6 votes
2 answers
552 views

Designing a mildly weird phonology

I want to design a mildly weird phonology with the following features Not particularly difficult to pronounce for speakers of average European languages Feeling somewhat unnatural or weird The ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
  • 11.3k
14 votes
3 answers
520 views

Which features make a language easier to learn?

Which features make a language easier to learn for children learning a constructed language as L1? Are children learning a language with these features able to learn the language faster than a natural,...
Duncan's user avatar
  • 1,743
15 votes
4 answers
699 views

Features of unlearnable languages

In this article about miniature artificial languages on motherboard.com experiments are described where children learn carafully designed miniature artificial languages. It is also said that children ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
  • 11.3k
8 votes
1 answer
142 views

Use of string reversion in conlangs

I came across the Esperantido Universal where reversion of stems (e.g., mega "big" ⁒ gema "small", -a is the adjective ending) is used to denote antonymy. Are there other conlangs using this unusual ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
  • 11.3k
34 votes
2 answers
933 views

Are there any grammatical aspects which do not have parallels in natural languages?

In Describing Morphosyntax, Payne uses a number of diagrams for visually explaining aspects and what they say about actions relative to time. Payne outlines the following, all of which occur in ...
L. L. Blumire's user avatar