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Diachronic conlanging refers to the simulation of language change in a conlang

7
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2answers
87 views

How to model the change of script over time

I want two languages to share a root but I want them to look unrecognizable written down (with the original language having a written form, so not independently created writing systems). Are there any ...
9
votes
2answers
76 views

How would the grammar of a conlang develop as a creole from other languages?

Assume that the backstory of a conlang is that it developed from a set of other languages. In other words, speakers of these (different) languages were living in the same area and were communicating ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

How to make good analogy in one's constructed language?

What steps can be taken to reproduce analogy in a constructed language? Which parts of grammar are more likely to evolve with analogy, and why? Are there rules for what analogy does to which words, or ...
3
votes
2answers
85 views

Soudwegian: A Swedish-German process similar to what happened to English and French?

The idea is that the Swedes retain a small bit of what is nowadays German territory that they conquered in the 17th century. This is now independent territory, Soudway, with a language of its own ...
32
votes
12answers
3k views

From known languages, what are the expected features of a Generation Ship Language?

Pandorum is a generation ship movie. Generation ships are a fairly big sub-genre of sci-fi where people live for many generations in a ship while travelling to a distant star. The movie Pandorum did ...
10
votes
3answers
239 views

Conlangs based on lesser known antique languages

The canon of classical languages studied in Europe comprises Latin, Greek, and Hebrew (and maybe classical Aramaic). Inspired by this answer mentioning a conlang based on Hittite, my follow-up ...
8
votes
3answers
106 views

Are there any rules of thumb for number of “steps” between two points in a language's natural development?

Let's suppose that you want to create Conlang B. You want this conlang to be derived from Conlang A. Let's also suppose that you have some arbitrary period of time in between A and B. Are there any ...
4
votes
2answers
136 views

Greek-based altlangs

The Wikipedia article on Artistic languages says in its current version What if Greek civilization had gone on to thrive without a Roman Empire, leaving Greek and not Latin to develop several ...
11
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2answers
144 views

How did Tolkien model diachronic changes in his Elvish languages?

Wikipedia explains that Tolkien modelled changes to his Elvish languages, something we'd call diachronic conlanging these days: Tolkien conceived a family tree of Elvish languages, all descending ...
8
votes
1answer
100 views

What are common origins of accusative case markers?

What are the primary way(s) accusative case markers can develop? The primary way of development of oblique case markers seems relatively straightforward, with attachment of adpositions (which can ...
9
votes
2answers
90 views

What is an overview of sound changes?

One of my works-in-progress is a language called Proto-Oreadin. As the name suggests, it is a proto-language, which eventually I am hoping to expand into a family of languages. Currently I have a ...
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2answers
103 views

I want to create a family of languages. Should I do one first or should I concentrate on all of them? [closed]

I want to create a whole family of related languages like a natural language family, like Semitic, Italic and Germanic languages. In what ways can this be done? What are the requirements, drawbacks ...
9
votes
1answer
147 views

How do tones disappear from a language?

There have been many good writeups on Tonogenesis, i.e. how language acquire tones. But never have I seen such a writeup on the opposite phenomenon, which one might call Tonoexodus. Obviously, one way ...