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What are reasons to construct a language? Why do people construct languages? For example, auxlangs are created for global (or regional) 'compatibility'. Why do people construct artlangs, altlangs, englangs, auxlangs and philangs?

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    This appears to be primarily opinion-based in its potential answers. Apr 25 '18 at 17:19
  • What way? An auxlang is by definition auxiliary, an artlang is by definition for art, etc.
    – Duncan
    Apr 25 '18 at 17:23
  • It's not any more opinion based than many questions here
    – Duncan
    Apr 25 '18 at 17:23
  • What do you mean by "certain types" of conlangs? Apr 25 '18 at 18:27
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    @DuncanWhyte These are most excellent glossopoetry oriented questions, but it really isn't the question type that SE is designed to handle. Your question is opinion based because, basically, you're asking for individual opinions. (Why questions almost always invite opinionated answers.) Your question is too broad because there is nothing like a right answer or even any fewer than 6433 right answers! TBC...
    – elemtilas
    Apr 26 '18 at 2:19
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I cannot speak for any other language creator, but I have done so as part of "worldbuilding" - for an alien world to have alien languages adds verisimilitude, and even if the language isn't actually heavily used, knowing how the language works and having a partial vocabulary lets me insert words from that language where there is no exact translation in English, or where the English would be a long circumlocution. As an example, one language I worked up has a word that means, literally, "a change in lighting that reveals new detail", but whose use has been extended to the metaphorical equivalent - and in one discussion in the associated story, after one character explained something to another, the second thanked the first - "That was a very useful kurìshdàm; thank you."

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  • See my revised question
    – Duncan
    Apr 25 '18 at 18:26

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