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Where are some free resources available online for learning how to create conlangs? I'm very new to this, however I can speak one conlang (toki pona).

I checked a few other questions this was marked as a duplicate of but they are not what I need. I'm looking for resources for learning to make conlangs (not conlang creation tools, like here) that are accessible online for free (rather than paid books like I found in the answers here).

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    Hi Jme, and welcome to the site! Can you explain how the answers to those questions aren't what you need? What in specific are you looking for that they don't provide?
    – Draconis
    Aug 8, 2023 at 4:29
  • @Draconis Sure! The first one was very close, but all the answers were books you had to pay for, whereas I'm looking for something accessible for free online. The second one does contain websites, but they're tools for conlang creation rather than tutorials on how to create one.
    – Jme
    Aug 8, 2023 at 20:34
  • Makes sense! If you edit that into the question, I'll vote to reopen it.
    – Draconis
    Aug 8, 2023 at 23:01
  • @Draconis Done! Look good to you?
    – Jme
    Aug 8, 2023 at 23:58
  • Looks good to me!
    – Draconis
    Aug 9, 2023 at 0:05

4 Answers 4

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I have been working a conlang for a few years now, and I initially found some free lists of words here and there, bought a book or two, but never really found them that deep.

Recently I encountered Lojban. If I were to start this process over learning from scratch, I would study Lojban. They tell you in there the history of how it was made, the problems they tried to solve, etc.. It's a pretty good glimpse into how to create a conlang. Here is a Lojban timeline.

I created a repo with some word/sentence lists to be able to know some things to cover at the basics. Wikipedia has a bunch of basic word lists, and there are some other spreadsheets floating around on the web somewhere.

But other than that, just wrapping your mind around the pieces of creating a conlang, there are several good books on this which I'm sure you've seen recommended (like the Language Construction Kit you linked to). Creating a sound system, maybe a writing system, creating a lexicon, and then creating the grammar (the real hard part, which there's not much out there for learning materials).

Toki Pona would also be another good conlang to study, for a minimalist perspective. Here is a word and grammer cheat sheet.

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  • Hey! It seems like the 10 word lists are broken? I checked 10 word list for adjectives and nouns and it gave me a 0-byte csv file... Other than that, are there any word lists for minimialist languages (like toki pona, as you mentioned)?
    – Jme
    Aug 17, 2023 at 2:07
  • Hey, op, I should probably remove the 10 word list, the main lists are the larger ones, thanks for pointing out. There is a toki pona word list, as there are only ~120 words in it. Another minimal lang being actively created is Bleep (spreadsheet here).
    – Lance
    Aug 17, 2023 at 4:28
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    Ooh! I'm already (mostly) fluent in toki pona, but I'll check out bleep! That seems interesting. Thanks :)
    – Jme
    Aug 17, 2023 at 5:31
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This isn't properly a conlang resource, but it's a language learning resource which is pretty useful, at least if your conlang is set in the modern world and not a fantasy one: Gabriel Wyner's 625 Word List of cross-linguistically common non-function words you may want to create to jumpstart your vocabulary generation and have something to start messing about with when you start the syntax.

Besides that, Zompist's Language Construction Kit, though it is not as detailed as the paid, print version you mention, still works fine as guide to get someone started and is still free. There was a time when it was just about everything that was available on the Web.

As for more modern materials, there are Artifexian's and David Peterson's Youtube channels have a lot of tutorials on how to organise your conlanging work. In fact, Peterson once gave a talk at Google where he sketched out the beginnings of a conlang in an hour, which you may try to emulate for an attempt 1.

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    Ah! I wish I could accept two answers, this is great! Thank you!
    – Jme
    Aug 21, 2023 at 22:26
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The conlang-guiding spreadsheets @Ylahris made, Der Spracherfinder, seeks to take a new person through stages and resources recommended by some of the other guides. It carries your work on one stage to the next stage.

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    A newer version is in the making!
    – Ylahris
    Sep 13, 2023 at 21:15
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I acknowledge that my response is late, but I'd like to provide a link to an updated version of my Der Spracherfinder that @Vir mentioned. Should you choose to use it, I hope it proves useful. I was in your situation before, and I was disappointed with the available tools. Thus, I created Der Spracherfinder in hopes of guiding new conlangers through the process, as well as providing a template for future projects. Why rebuild the factory each time to build a tire?

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  • Thanks! I honestly do not know enough about linguistics to understand most of this, but it looks amazing!
    – Jme
    Oct 28, 2023 at 2:06
  • Conlanging does have a steep learning curve. I learned basics by watching Artifexian and Biblardion. Check out their YouTube channels if you have not already.
    – Ylahris
    Oct 29, 2023 at 16:05

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