deleted 58 characters in body
Source Link

Are there examples of conlangs that combineare used by applying their ownstructure such as grammar, sentence structure, intonation, means of combining words, etc…, but are keeping some with other features of anothera given language, or anygiven member of a class of languages?

This has the disadvantage that for understanding one would have to know both the language in question, call this X, and the language it's adapting, call this Y.

For example and in particular I'm thinking that X could use the alphabet and all the single morpheme nouns and verbs of Y, but replace every other aspect of the language with its own.

A possible advantage could be in allowing the speaker more reachable access to an unfamiliar linguistic conlang environment, be that a conlang or a natural language, where different modes of thought are the most natural. Alternatively the approach could be used as a teaching aid and way of building interest for learning mainstream foreign languages.

Are there examples of conlangs that combine their own grammar, sentence structure, intonation, means of combining words, etc…, but are keeping some features of another language, or any of a class of languages?

This has the disadvantage that for understanding one would have to know both the language in question, call this X, and the language it's adapting, call this Y.

For example and in particular I'm thinking that X could use the alphabet and all the single morpheme nouns and verbs of Y, but replace every other aspect of the language with its own.

A possible advantage could be in allowing the speaker access to an unfamiliar linguistic conlang environment where different modes of thought are the most natural. Alternatively the approach could be used as a teaching aid and way of building interest for learning mainstream foreign languages.

Are there examples of conlangs that are used by applying their structure such as grammar, sentence structure, intonation, means of combining words, etc… with other features of a given language or given member of a class of languages?

This has the disadvantage that for understanding one would have to know both the language in question, call this X, and the language it's adapting, call this Y.

For example and in particular I'm thinking that X could use the alphabet and all the single morpheme nouns and verbs of Y, but replace every other aspect of the language with its own.

A possible advantage could be in allowing the speaker more reachable access to an unfamiliar linguistic environment, be that a conlang or a natural language, where different modes of thought are the most natural.

copy editing
Source Link
Oliver Mason
  • 3.1k
  • 4
  • 21

Are there examples of conlangs that impose therecombine their own structure such as grammar, sentence structure, intonation that carries meaning, means of combining words, etc… But, but are intended to be used withkeeping some features of any otheranother language, or any of a class of languages?

This has the downsidedisadvantage that for understanding the speakerone would have to know both the language in question, call this X, and the language it's adapting, call this Y.

For example and in-particular particular I'm thinking that X could use the alphabet and all the single morpheme nouns and verbs of Y, but replace every other workingaspect of the language with its own.

A possible advantage could be in allowing the speaker access to an unfamiliar linguistic conlang environment where different modes of thought are the most natural. Alternatively the approach could be used as a teaching aid and way of building interest for learning mainstream foreign languages.

Are there examples of conlangs that impose there own structure such as grammar, sentence structure, intonation that carries meaning, means of combining words, etc… But are intended to be used with some features of any other language, or any of a class of languages?

This has the downside that for understanding the speaker would have to know both the language in question, call this X, and the language it's adapting, call this Y.

For example and in-particular I'm thinking that X could use the alphabet and all the single morpheme nouns and verbs of Y, but replace every other working of the language with its own.

A possible advantage could be in allowing the speaker access to an unfamiliar linguistic conlang environment where different modes of thought are the most natural. Alternatively the approach could be used as a teaching aid and way of building interest for learning mainstream foreign languages.

Are there examples of conlangs that combine their own grammar, sentence structure, intonation, means of combining words, etc…, but are keeping some features of another language, or any of a class of languages?

This has the disadvantage that for understanding one would have to know both the language in question, call this X, and the language it's adapting, call this Y.

For example and in particular I'm thinking that X could use the alphabet and all the single morpheme nouns and verbs of Y, but replace every other aspect of the language with its own.

A possible advantage could be in allowing the speaker access to an unfamiliar linguistic conlang environment where different modes of thought are the most natural. Alternatively the approach could be used as a teaching aid and way of building interest for learning mainstream foreign languages.

Source Link

Structure only conlang? Nouns?

Are there examples of conlangs that impose there own structure such as grammar, sentence structure, intonation that carries meaning, means of combining words, etc… But are intended to be used with some features of any other language, or any of a class of languages?

This has the downside that for understanding the speaker would have to know both the language in question, call this X, and the language it's adapting, call this Y.

For example and in-particular I'm thinking that X could use the alphabet and all the single morpheme nouns and verbs of Y, but replace every other working of the language with its own.

A possible advantage could be in allowing the speaker access to an unfamiliar linguistic conlang environment where different modes of thought are the most natural. Alternatively the approach could be used as a teaching aid and way of building interest for learning mainstream foreign languages.